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Lucchese

Ever since I spent time in Houston consulting to the energy industry I have worn Lucchese boots. After visiting the CEO of a large pipeline company a few times he decided he needed to buy me a pair of boots and took me over to a store that sold Lucchese boots. From the minute I put them on I loved them. Beautiful workmanship, extremely comfortable, and…being of a normal height…they made me 2 inches taller.

I have worn them ever since. Currently I have a couple of newer pairs and a few pairs that are worn out and only usable for non-business occasions. I almost always buy the same kind: Classic goatskin with the most pointed toes in a dark mahogany color. They go great when I have to wear a suit or other formal attire and yet are perfect with jeans.

A few weeks ago I noticed my newest pair, worn so little that they still had the original heal pads, were tearing where the leather met the sole. I don’t know much about making boots so after much perusal realized that I needed to send them to the experts.

I called Lucchese and spoke with the pleasant fellow who answered the phone. He listened for a minute and then sent me right to a wonderful man, Albert Resendez. I shared my story with Albert who without any hemming or hawing immediately asked for my email and told me he would send me information on how to send the boots to Lucchese and would include a UPS label I could print out and put on the box. He told me it would only take a few days after they arrived to decide what to do and then he would let me know.

So calm, so clear, so ready to help.

I send off the boots hoping that perhaps they will fix them for free but expecting to hear the damage was due to something I did or perhaps the salt that has been used so much this ridiculously snowy and icy year in my part of the world and I will have to pay a repair charge.

UPS tells me my boots will take 5 or 6 days to get to the hospital so imagine my surprise when 8 days after sending them I get a note from Albert saying:

“Good News.

Your boots have arrived at our Lucchese warehouse.

They will be sent to our production floor to get repaired.

I have an estimated shipping date of 3/03/14

I will try to get these to you as soon as possible.”

Such responsiveness. But even beyond this, imagine my amazement when I received another email from Albert a week later that reads:

“Great News!

Your new Lucchese’s boots have been shipped.”

You read that correctly. With these few words Albert told me that Lucchese had decided my boots had a defect that was their fault and they were sending me a brand new pair.

I sit here typing this wearing my new Lucchese boots. I have shared this story with quite a few people I have run into since they arrived some days ago…well ahead of the day I was first given. And now I share the story about a great company with the mass of my readers and the readers of those who re-post my missives. I imagine thousands will hear it in talks I give or read it through the passing along of this missive.

I’ve been thinking quite a bit…and spreading the word…about those who lead Lucchese and the culture they set. Highest quality product, highest quality service, and most importantly…highest quality people.

 

Help or Hinder?

Some leaders set the stage for everyone to do their best work while others consistently make it harder for their folks to do their best. According to research by Kannan Ramaswamy and William Youngdahl  “your employees are more likely to view you as an obstacle to their effectiveness than as an enabler of it.”

To make it even worse, they found this is true whether your company is successful or having problems. In either case, the likelihood is that you are making things worse than they could be. What an indictment of organization leaders.

In Are You Your Employees’ Worst Enemy? they share their research which found four main issues employees have with most leaders:

  • 51% of employees say their leader hinders more than helps
  • 44% say their leader doesn’t communicate purpose and direction
  • 77% say their leader doesn’t consider organizational capacity when rolling out new iniatiatives
  • 64% say their leader doesn’t set and maintain useful policies

Worst of all it comes from the culture the leader sets. A culture where the leader fails to encourage honest, open, ongoing feedback on what’s going on.  A culture where people think the leader doesn’t want to hear from them, or worse, where they fear retribution. A culture where the ideas of the leader are disconnected from the realities of the business and the capabilities of the employees.

But all is not lost. Take heed of the words of the former BP CEO John Browne who said “I wish someone had challenged me and been brave enough to say: ‘we need to ask more disagreeable questions.’”

Take a look around. Do a self evaluation. Talk to a trusted advisor who will tell you the truth…if you don’t have such a person, find one immediately. Get off the leader high horse and experience humility in all you do. After all, everything good that happens really isn’t all due to you.

But most of all, open your door and mean it. Encourage open and honest comments. Walk around and really talk to people. No, walk around and really listen to everyone.

Intense listening, the most important skill of all.

 

 

 

Microsoft has a new CEO. Oddly, at the same time the Microsoft Founder and first CEO, Bill Gates, has given up his Chairman seat to become something called ‘technology advisor’ to Nadella. I say oddly because it seems that Gates is descending from the mount of Chairman to the trenches and actually go back to work at Microsoft on a regular basis…regular being a commitment to spend at least a third of his time there and pull back from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation which has been filling up most of his time.

It’s very strange times at Microsoft. The media is filled with doom and gloom stories about Microsoft’s coming fall and yet in the six months to December their revenues were $43 Billion, up 15% from the previous year while net was $11.8 Billion, up 8.8%. Not to mention the company is sitting on $84 Billion in cash. Kind of hard to feel sorry for them.

Although he gave up his Chairmanship, Gates will remain on the board as will the Steve Balmer who Nadella replaces. Hardly the break with the current situation that many had looked for. The founder and his successor as CEO both looking over your shoulder at everything you do while the founder actually gets to “give you advice” 15 hours a week…with the entire world watching.

Sounds like fun, doesn’t it?

Nadella has more than 22 years at Microsoft. Apparently after interviewing more than 100 top executives, many CEOs of major corporations, the best was hanging around inside running the cloud and enterprise group. It does cause you to wonder. What was the critical factor in the selection?

Would a well known CEO of a global company really want to go to work with Gates and Ballmer watching over him and Gates showing up to give advice every few hours? Was the selection committee worried about hiring someone who really expected to run things without those guys hovering over him? Did they discover that Nadella has a vision for future success he kept hidden until he knew he was a possibility for the Big Job?

Who knows? Not me.

The most interesting thing is that it opens up a whole collection of issues and questions about finding the right person to become CEO…and what to do with the previous ones. A collection of issues and questions that many face and yet few seem to fully evaluate and think through.

It is so hard to be objective when your own future is at stake in the decision…and your own past will be evaluated against the results of the new person.

The fun thing for all of us on the outside looking in is…we get to predict how they did and what will happen with no particular effect on ourselves. Unless I suppose, you own Microsoft stock or happen to be tied to their products and services in some way.

 

 

 

 

 

As the extreme damage is repaired from the most recent storm that hit where I live, I’ve been listening to the pronouncements about return of electricity and such from PECO, my local electric company. It has been a mastery of nice sounding words devoid of information about what people asked: when will my power be restored?

It got me thinking about the years I spent working quite a bit in Japan. I was intrigued by how non-Japanese so often misunderstood what was being said and what was going on. The language was English, generally quite good English, but the way the words were used by the Japanese was so culturally based that they were often devoid of meaning to Americans. Worse, the Americans gave meaning based on their cultural background and thus often greatly misinterpreted. My Japanese partner and I used to talk about this, he laughing at the silly Americans, me being embarrassed for the oblivious Americans.

Then, one day he shared an old Japanese story.

There was a town drunk who claimed to be enlightened. A group of people at the bar decided to find out how enlightened he really was by inviting a famous Zen monk to test him. The monk comes to the bar and initiates a conversation with the drunk with a large gesture of both arms. No words are spoken. The drunk, using two fingers, responds with a tiny gesture. They continue in this way, a silent conversation of gestures.

After a time the drunk retires to attend to a pressing need. As soon as he’s gone, the group asks the monk if the drunk passed the test. To their amazement, the monk proclaims the drunk to be enlightened indeed. The monk starts by explaining how he began with a gesture meaning all the world is one. The drunk perfectly responded with a gesture meaning everything is contained in a microcosm of the smallest object.

The Zen monk goes on to explain each of his gestures and the drunk’s responses in terms of his theology, then leaves shaking his head in amazement.

The drunk staggers back into the bar. The group asks what he thought of the monk and he responds how great a guy the monk is. Explaining further, the drunk shares how the monk started the conversation with a gesture meaning that sake comes in very large barrels…to which he pointed out that we drink it in tiny cups.

 

Snowstorm

Today where I sit writing this, we’re having another snowstorm. There have been an unending series of them leading to all kinds of difficult situations.  Closed schools and businesses, tens of thousands of cancelled flights, people stranded everywhere or even worse…in accidents and injured or killed. The cost to individuals, companies, and the country as a whole is enormous.

And yet, with the exception of a few unable to grasp that this is beyond their, or anyone else’s control, everyone takes it in stride. There are some frayed tempers and irritated would be flyers but also happy children and lots of new snowpeople.

In a day or two all will be back to normal and this will become just another story to share over a beer. People are very resilient, able to overcome quite an array of difficult things and get on with life.

I left my house before the storm hit to attend a very early meeting, at 6:30 in the morning. By the time I left the meeting at 10:30 the roads were horrendous. Luckily most people had stayed home so there wasn’t too much traffic. Still, it took me several times as long as it normally does to get home.

As I crawled along avoiding cars abandoned by the roadside or sliding sideways in front of me, I was struck by several things.

First off, everyone was being incredibly polite. People were carefully giving each other lots of room. No one was racing past even though the two highway  lanes going my way had a single lane of cars in the middle reaching a top speed of around 25 miles per hour. I did not hear a single horn blaring in spite of cars sliding all over the place.

Then I got thinking about how employers were doing such a good job of looking out for the welfare of their people. Stay home and be safe rather than come to work in spite of the conditions. Tomorrow is another day and we’ll catch up with what was missed.

It occurred to me how sad it is that it takes a huge storm or similar disaster to bring everyone together working to ensure all are taken care of. How is it that suddenly we become one big family working for the good of all and forget that which separates us.

We talk about business culture quite a bit. Culture: the way we actually do things rather than the way we say we do things.

The saying part always is about good things. Customers come first. People are out most important resource. The highest quality in all we do.

The doing part is a different story. Sometimes the things said are meant and exemplified but all too often they are merely talking points, advertising hype, aspirations rather than actualities.

Perhaps what companies need is to operate as though in the middle of a storm where the only path of safety is for all to work together for the common good. A good storm has a way of focusing your attention on the important things and ensuring that the saying and the doing are aligned. A good storm does have a way of cutting through the verbiage and getting right down to the actions.

Snowstorm 1-20140203-00698

 

 

How is it that the most incompetent so often think they are experts? How can their self assessment of their knowledge and expertise be so at variance with the reality of their incompetence?

According to the research of Cornell University psychologists David Dunning and Justin Kruger, as reported in Pacific Standard, “when people are incompetent not only do they reach erroneous conclusions and make unfortunate choices, but their incompetence robs them of the ability to realize it.”

The Dunning-Kruger Effect is all around us. Politicians unable to understand why nothing they legislate works, inarticulate writers who think their language skills are phenomenal, and, dare we mention it…managers clueless about losses directly attributable to their poor decisions. When we know least we are often most confident in our knowledge.

Conversely, those who truly are experts tend to underrate themselves. They know how much more there is to know and so think they are less competent than they really are. Those too blind to understand their limitations and how little they know are confident while those with great expertise realize there is more to know and so understate their competence.

We are surrounded by both types of people. Pay attention and figure out which are which when getting advice or your car repaired. When you notice those lacking in competence but proclaiming expertise, give them a little negative feedback and help them come to grips with the reality of their knowledge, or lack thereof. Keep them from harming others, or your company, in their euphoria of incompetence.

Those that underplay their talents, encourage them to offer advice and guide decisions. Ensure they are heard and treasured for their unassuming competence is what ultimately will lead to the greatest success.

And you? Where do you fit in this spectrum of expertise?

As W B Yeats wrote, “the best lack all conviction while the worst are full of passionate intensity.”

 

 

Energy of Africa

I just returned from a project in Benin and Rwanda with a bit of time in Ethiopia. During my 10 day trip we interviewed dozens of people ranging from Ministers and executives to people with booths in the local markets. While there I was able to get out into the rural areas and talk to people. It was an exhilarating experience.

Without exception everyone we talked to was energized about the opportunity in front of them. While cataloguing a variety of problems starting with the need for more electricity, education, and internet infrastructure they invariably ended with stories about good things to come.

I was struck by how it didn’t matter whether they were those with great economic resources or those without, they were excited about the future. On the flight back I got thinking about the difference in mindset between the business people and government officials in these countries from that of so many I meet in the United States.

In Benin and Rwanda I found a feeling of opportunity, an unwillingness to let current conditions or situations cause them to despair. In the United States I so often hear a feeling of defeat, that things are bad and won’t get better.

The culture of opportunity versus the culture of defeat.

Think about the companies you know…and yours. Some are filled with people putting in time and keeping their heads down. It’s a job and nothing else. The energy is low, excitement is non-existence. They can’t wait to leave the place at day’s end.

Other companies are filled with people excited about the future and their place in it. They can’t wait to arrive in the morning and see what the new day will bring.

A culture striving to create a better future versus a culture that sees nothing in the future.

The thing that most intrigued me was how it all came from the top. The leaders of Benin and Rwanda, both government and company, are upbeat, excited, enthusiastic, and paint a picture of a better future. The leaders of the United States too often are depressed, boring, and without any vision of the path to a better future.

What happens? Exactly. People see the energy in the walk or the hunch of the shoulders. They hear the words and notice the actions. And then they follow the culture that these create.

And so goes the company, or country. Moving forward together to build a better future for all or at each others throats’ trying to get their piece of what exists today.

Walk with energy.

commitment

 

Over the years there has been much speculation about the different ways men and women think and what they’re better at doing. Depending on your bias and experience, you believe they think completely differently or there is little difference. Ragini Verma, Associate Professor Radiology at Pereleman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania, has now used a new technology, diffusion tensor imaging, for mapping the way the brain works and so has added facts to the debate.

The research she and her colleagues have recently published in the Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences has discovered clear differences in the way brains of men and women function. Below is a picture of the connections, men in blue, women in orange. Visit Brain Connectivity Study for a better view and more information about the study.

It turns out in men the dominant connections are within each of the two brain hemispheres. In women the dominant connections are between hemispheres. The differences in connections have major impact on the way men’s and women’s brains process information and the behavior and skills this leads to. Neither is better or worse, they’re just different. For our purposes, the important thing is to realize that you need both ways of thinking for greatest success.

While there is variation, Verma’s research begins to explain why women tend to have better memories and be more able multitaskers while men tend to be more monomaniacal and have better motor and spatial abilities. Their brains operate in different ways, connecting different parts of the brain more strongly which leads to these differences.

What does this mean for business? All kinds of things. To name a few areas of impact, there are implications for management, team composition, coaching, training, and communication. Think about how advertisers have used these differences to great effect.

Unfortunately this goes against the idea that we all should be treated exactly the same way. It seems we each need different things. Luckily these two ideas of equality and difference can both be accommodated, if you keep them in mind.

As a manager you need to ensure that you accommodate all ways of thinking. Your style, your communication, your actions need to incorporate messages that address all types of people. To the extent that you are able to speak to everyone, that you view variety of style as a strength and use it well, that you accommodate different needs and ways of thinking, you build an engaged passionate organization able to work together to realize your big vision.

As the new year begins, it’s a perfect time to improve your ability to pay attention. As Daniel Goleman says in The Focused Leader in Harvard Business Review, “A primary task of leadership it to direct attention.” But pay attention to what? And why?

Neuroscience tells us that we focus in a variety of ways, to various things, for many different reasons. Ever moment we are focusing on something, the key is to understand the impact and learn how to ensure you’re paying attention to the right things to achieve your goals.

Attention can be divided into three main areas, each with it’s own uses…and failures if used poorly or totally ignored. Together they enable you to pay attention appropriately depending on the outcome you’re aiming for. Oddly, they both work together and against each other depending on the situation. Management excellence requires the effective use of each, independently and together.

Focus on yourself: The ability to be self-aware and understand your inner voice, your body’s signals, your gut feelings.

Focus on others: The ability to be aware of what others need, to understand their perspective, to know what they feel.

Focus on the world: The ability to notice the world around you, to listen well and ask good questions, to project into the future.

Focusing on one to the exclusion of the others blinds you to part of the reality around you. It causes you to be unaware of important information that will lead to better decisions. You lose your ability to accurately read and understand yourself, others, and/or the world around you.

As we rise in power you tend to become more self-referential, our attention develops blinders. We miss more and more of importance and so don’t notice when things begin to deteriorate. Lack of attention sets the stage for our downfall.

At the same time, as we have access to more and more information instantly, we lose the ability to pay attention to anything for long enough to truly absorb and understand it. We take shortcuts that lead to missing things of importance. The volume causes us to overload. We know more and more facts but often have less and less knowledge.

As Herbert Simon, Nobel Laureate Economist said years ago, “a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.”

The most important thing about attention is to be aware of it’s impact on all you do. You can’t control all that distracts from focus and attention but you can be aware of it and act accordingly. You can control what you focus on and manage your attention to ensure you balance attention to self, to others, to the world.

To again quote Coleman, “failure to focus inwardly leaves you rudderless, failure to focus on others leaves you clueless, failure to focus outward may leave you blindsided.”

Control your attention…and have better control over the results you achieve.

Year End

It’s the last week of the year, holiday time around the world. One of the few events that everyone everywhere shares, although there are some who place it on somewhat different days. No matter. The turning of the year is a time of festivity…a chance to dump the old and set the new.

A time of rebirth with the chance to begin anew with better ideas and actions.

A time to re-charge your body and brain.

Last missive from Benari was about Mandela, a man of uncommon…perhaps unique these days…character. As the year turns and you think about how you will approach the new one, think about Mandela. He wasn’t a saint but still he managed to leave a worldwide legacy of exceptional leadership.

As you think about resolutions for improvement, think about incorporating some of the leadership traits of Mandela. Put his picture on your mirror and every morning think about how you too can build a culture of inclusiveness that draws people in and encourages them to work together to achieve exceptional results for all.

After all, exceptional results for all is an excellent result for your business and other activities. We all have a bit of Mandela within us…let it lead you to greatness.

 

Mandela

As I listened live to the funeral of Nelson Mandela I got thinking about why he has become the worldwide icon for exemplary leadership. You all know his story.

His early years were filled with violence as he led the fight for freedom from apartheid. This led to 27 years in a tiny prison cell as he continued the fight and refused to bend in order to get released. As apartheid ended and he was given his freedom, he forsook revenge for reconciliation as he became president of South Africa. In spite of overwhelming interest in his continuing as president, he left the presidency when his term ended rather than run again, an unusual thing for a president to do…particularly in Africa.

Think about the characteristics of a man or woman able to live such a life. Think about the strength of will, the absolute belief that all should be included and given the chance to prosper, the willingness to relinquish position for the greater good in spite of the wealth and power it promised. Think about someone so able to put the good of others before himself.

Few have such vision and strength of character.

He set an example for the world and the world embraced him. And yet, he did not let the reverence showered on him divert him from his path, the path to empowerment and freedom for all. The idea of creating a culture where all can shine and be their best.

 

 

Most of you have noticed that Google is doing quite well by just about every measure. It’s so ubiquitous that its very name has become a verb. Google’s stock price has risen over 900% since it went public nine years ago. It’s buying everything in sight and inventing what it hasn’t found to buy.

Google gets over 2.5 milion job applications a year, about 5 every single minute. They hire about 1 in 12 applicants. People are beating down the doors to work there.

How do they stay on top of things? Exceptional management that builds and maintains an exceptional culture. As with everyting at Google, they measure managers carefully which has led to their list of the 8 key behaviors of their most effective managers.

As listed in the Harvard Business Review article “How Google Sold Its Engineers on Management” by David Garvin, here are the skills exemplified by these top Google managers:

1. Is a good coach

2. Empowers the team and does not micromanage

3. Expresses interest in and concern for team members’ success and personal well-being

4. Is productive and results-oriented

5. Is a good communicator-listens and shares information

6. Helps with career development

7. Has a clear vision and strategy for the team

8. Has key technical skills that help him or her advise the team

Not a bad list for every manager out there. I was particularly intrigued that the very first one is: is a good coach. The most important skill for the best manages is coaching everyone else to be their best. Way down at the bottom of the list is: has technical skills that help him or her advise the team.

What struck me most about this is how the skills of the best Google managers are in the opposite order of how so many people hire their managers. First they look at technical skill and last…if at all…they worry about the ability to coach everyone else to greatness.

The most important things are the manager’s ability to build strong people, to empower people, to care about people. What happens? People respond and deliver superior performance.

Right people encouraging and guiding engaged and passionate employees and the results you hope for will follow.

 

 

Break Time

The year has entered its final month. The pressure is rising on everyone as they work to ensure final results meet whatever goals were set so long ago. The onset of the year end holiday season is building excitement…and tension…everywhere. Tempers get short, memories get shorter. And as the party season gets into full swing, it’s all often fueled by a bit too much to drink and a certain lessening of the normal rules of behavior.

It’s time for a break…a clarity break. A time to put it all aside, rest your body and brain, and let your thoughts wander to some desert isle.

So…instead of writing a few hundred words for you to read and ponder, I’m keeping this short. Take the time you save…no take the time and multiply it by 100…and go off, put your feet up, and picture that beautiful island.

Let the tension go, let you body and brain relax. Forget it all for a few hours while you recharge and prepare to stay calm, maintain your composure, and not do something you’ll regret as the year ends.

Set an example. Those around you will appreciate it.

 

While reading an article in the Wall Street Journal by Laura Landro, The Biggest Mistake Doctors Make, I noticed a chart. It is called “Common biases that can prevent a doctor from making a correct diagnosis”. In addition to causing me great concern about the next time I have an odd symptom so visit a physician, I realized that it describes exactly the same issues that keep executives from making the right decisions.

At first I was going to discuss the article but upon further reflection realized that I should just share it as is, including leaving it in medical mode. Perhaps some of these reasons for misdiagnosis will feel familiar…and require some strong personal medicine to overcome.

The ABCs of Misdiagnosis

Anchoring: Locking on to salient features in the patient’s initial presentation too early in the diagnostic process and failing to adjust for conflicting or new information

Availability: Recent experience with a disease may inflate the likelihood of its being diagnosed. Conversely, if a disease has not been seen for a long time it may be underdiagnosed

Bandwagon Effect: The tendency for people on a medical team to believe and do certain things because many others are doing so

Confirmation Bias: The tendency to look for confirming evidence to support a diagnosis rather than look for evidence to refute it, despite the latter often being more persuasive and definitive

Diagnosis Momentum: Once diagnosis labels are attached to patients, what might have started as a possibility gathers increasing momentum until it becomes definitive and all other possibilities are excluded

Fundamental Attribution Error: The tendancy to be judgmental and blame patients, especially psychiatric and minority patients, for their illnesses, rather than examine the circumstances that might have been responsible

Gender Bias: The tendency to believe that gender is a determining factor in the probability of diagnosis of a particular disease when no such bias exists

Need For Closure: Drawing a conclusion or making a verdict about something when it is still not definite, often when the doctor feels obliged to make a specific diagnosis under conditions of time or social pressure, or to escape feelings of doubt or uncertainty

Outcome Bias: The tendency to opt for diagnosis decisions that will lead to good outcomes, rather than those associated with bad outcomes

Overconfidence Bias: A tendency to act on incomplete information, intuition or hunches. Too much faith is placed in opinion instead of carefully gathered evidence

Sunk Costs: The more time and mental energy clinicians invest in a particular diagnosis, the less likely they may be to let it go and consider alternatives

Unpacking Principle: Failure to elicit all relevant information from patients in a medical history

Zebra Retreat: Occurs when a rare diagnosis, or zebra, figures prominently, but the physician retreats for various reasons: perceived inertia in the system and barriers to obtaining special or costly tests, self-consciousness and underconfidence about entertaining a remote and unusual diagnosis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fired

I’ve been following the firing of Steve Ballmer, soon to be ex-CEO Microsoft. Among other things, I noticed he has personal wealth estimated at $18 billion so I don’t feel too bad for him figuring he will still be able to eat out often. What did get me interested was the manner of his firing and the time it took.

It seems that the board…and many shareholders…have been unhappy with his leadership for quite some time. In fact, it’s been years. Yet even as he clearly showed he was unable to be the leader Microsoft requires these days to fight off the myriad of competitors, the board bought into excuse after excuse and promise after promise. Perhaps bought in is too strong but certainly they allowed themselves to be convinced to give him one more chance to show he could re-build shareholder value and regain the leadership place Microsoft once held.

In spite of overwhelming evidence that change was required, the board dawdled.

Finally, under pressure from major shareholders and the continual failure not just to anticipate technological advances but even to take advantage of them when they proved winners for competitors…they sent him packing. Well, at least they have hired recuiters to begin the search and one of these days he will be replaced.

It got me thinking about one of the best interview questions ever when hiring top executives. “Tell me about the last person you fired.”

So much comes forth in the response. You learn about the candidate’s willingness to make difficult decisions, ability to act rather than delay, tolerance for excuses, compassion for others. How long it took to bid the fired good by and the way it was done tell you much about the candidate’s style as a leader and the culture they will build.

Most interesting are those who say “the last person I fired was myself.” It is a rare person who is so committed to doing what is needed that when they build an organization that doesn’t need them anymore they recognize this and fire themselves.

Then there are those who just can’t act no matter how badly the ship is leaking. It takes a catastrophe or intense outside pressure to force them to make the decision they should have made months or years ago. It’s quite a different culture they build.

In today’s world of decreasing size and increasingly rapid change, good leadership requires the ability to make decisions rapidly and then act on them even if the person creating the problem and requiring a change of venue is the leader themself. The most difficult decisions of all are those requiring you to deal with yourself.

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